Glo-cal Leadership 2017 (Sarah Rice)

As local leaders we engage with the global world through our multicultural society, and so become glo-cal leaders. This presents a range of challenges but also exciting opportunities. In this option I (Sarah Rice) shall be drawing on my own experience as an migrant and explore the issue most migrant’s face, which is stereotypes associated with where they come from.

When someone walks in the door of your church who is from a different culture they are met with an already formed narrative of who they are. One of the main ways stereotypes of migrants are formed in New Zealand is through Non Governmental Organization* messaging. Any messaging instantly constitutes people’s identity, giving NGO’s power over people of different nationalities representation and thus conditioning church’s view of people. For example Africa, is associated largely with poverty and orphans, we often do not hear that Christianity is growing like wildfire there nor that they are now sending missionaries to New Zealand.

There are many global issues we need to engage with locally, like Refugees, poverty and Muslim migrants, but often what causes apathy is stereotyping and not partnering with people who come from those communities - stereotyping separates our worlds and makes it confusing to know how to respond.

*We wish to respond to poverty and so NGO’s are a great way to be able to do that but we also do not want to dehumanize people in the process.

This Glo-cal leadership option will help you critically analysis NGO messaging and help you welcome in the global church who is now local in New Zealand.

In the first few weeks, as you begin:

Email the facilitator: Sarah Rice to introduce yourself: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

Include your reflections on these questions:

  • What have been some of your first impression of people from a different part of New Zealand or country?
  • Even before you met them did you experience any preconceived ideas of what their story was?
  • Can you identify a narrative you saw them in?
  • How do you assess if NGO’s are showing a gospel message (just because they are speaking about the poor does not make it Christian content)?
  • Have you experienced people stereotyping you in a single story? How did it feel?

This is to enable you at the end of this option to assess any changes throughout the ten-month period.

Over the ten months:

There are 2x scripture-video-journal-action-reflections, 2x scripture-reading-journal-action-reflections and 1x scripture-interview-journal-action-reflections– aim to cover one every two months. There will also be three skype calls throughout the course with Sarah.

Topic 1 January-February

Scripture: John 4 Jesus Talks With a Samaritan Woman

Video: Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie: The danger of a single story, TEDGlobal 2009, 18:49, Filmed Jul 2009

Click here to watch Chimamanda’s Ted talk

Journal: The lady at the well had a single story, what was it? Had it caused isolation for her? How did Jesus interact with her and get to the story behind the story of who she truly was? How did he bring her back into society and change people's perceptions of her?

Action: Ask five different people in your church, what the first words that come to mind are when they hear: Africa, Muslim, Asia, Maori, Europe and Refugee. See if they say any similarities. Are their any single stories? Then ask where they have primarily been hearing about these topics?

Reflection: Use the five questions in the Lifelong Learning for Registration Reflection Guide as a basis to aid your reflection with each reading. Use your response to these questions as conversation starting points when you meet with your coach/supervisor, who is to be a dialogue partner as you engage with this material (meet with them at least once every two months).

 

Topic 2 March - April

Scripture: Acts 19.8-20

Reading: Rachel A.M. Tallon & Andrew McGregor (2014) Pitying the Third World: towards more progressive emotional responses to development education in schools, Third World Quarterly, 35:8, 1406-1422 Click here for PDF of reading.

Rachel Tallon goes to Epuni Baptist Church and has done extensive research on how NGO messaging is affecting school children in New Zealand. I currently am doing pilot research on how New Zealand churches are affected by NGO messaging and so far the results are fairly similar.

Journalling: The church in Ephesus was born and was very multicultural, Jews, Greeks and people from many different countries where there. Some born into the society and others were migrantes. The church has always been global and multicultural - reflect on your church history, how much have you heard the global church outside of western society?

Action: Write a 500 word reflection on Rachel Tallon’s article and Acts 19 for your elders and send a copy to This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it..

Reflection: Use the five questions in the Lifelong Learning for Registration Reflection Guide as a basis to aid your reflection with each reading. Use your response to these questions as conversation starting points when you meet with your coach, who is to be a dialogue partner as you engage with this material (meet with them at least once every two months).

 

Topic 3 May - June

Scripture: Read the Letter to Philemon and a commentary on the Letter to Philemon.
This can be ordered through the Carey Library.

Reading: Sarah’s story from Baptist Magazine “Standing in the Gap”

Journalling: What stood out to you in the Letter to Philemon? What stood out to you in the commentary?

Action: Is there someone in your church who has experienced the realities of the single story who can share for 5 minutes about their experience in a Sunday service? How did people receive the story?

Reflection: Use the five questions in the Lifelong Learning for Registration Reflection Guide as a basis to aid your reflection with each reading. Use your response to these questions as conversation starting points when you meet with your coach, who is to be a dialogue partner as you engage with this material (meet with them at least once every two months).

 

Topic 4 July - August

Scripture: TBC

Video: Watch two videos from:

The Rusty Radiator Award goes to the fundraising video with the worst use of stereotypes. This kind of portrayal is not only unfair to the persons portrayed in the campaign, but also hinders long-term development and the fight against poverty.

The Golden Radiator Award goes to the fundraising video using creativity and creating engagement. This kind of charity campaign is stepping outside of the common way with using stereotypes.

The Radi-Aid Awards aim at addressing the following issues:

  • Charity campaigns risk being counterproductive to their own goals if they obscure the actual causes of poverty. We need more nuanced information about development and poverty, not oversimplified half-truths.
  • In many charity ads, poor people are portrayed as passive recipients of help, without the ability or desire to make their country a better place to live. This kind of portrayal creates a significant distinction between us and them.
  • The last years have shown increasing examples of creative and engaging portrayals in charity ads, demonstrating the many various ways a charity campaign can succeed without traditional and stereotypical representations.
  • Stereotypes and oversimplifications lead to poor debates and poor policies. NGO communicators play a crucial role in people’s understanding of development in the world today, and therefore also a crucial role in fighting these representations.

Journalling: TBC

Action: At a pastor’s cluster meeting, ask how your peers how they assess NGO marketing material they show.

Reflection: Use the five questions in the Lifelong Learning for Registration Reflection Guide as a basis to aid your reflection with each reading. Use your response to these questions as conversation starting points when you meet with your coach, who is to be a dialogue partner as you engage with this material (meet with them at least once every two months), focus each meeting on a particular reading and action.

 

Topic 5 September - October

Scripture: TBC

Interview/action: Is there someone in your congregation you can meet up with who is from another culture? Or someone outside of your congregation? Ask to meet for up to 2 hours to talk about their story. Spend time forming questions you would like to ask them. For example: What is something you eished people would ask you about the place you have come from? How do you think New Zealand citizens see you? Etc etc.

Journalling: TBC

Reflection: Use the five questions in the Lifelong Learning for Registration Reflection Guide as a basis to aid your reflection with each reading. Use your response to these questions as conversation starting points when you meet with your coach, who is to be a dialogue partner as you engage with this material (meet with them at least once every two months).

 

November

By 15 November, following the five activities and regular meetings with your coach, write a 1000 word or 10 minute video NGO appeal focused on the Refugee Crisis (you can choose any context or country), the audience is Baptist Churches around New Zealand.

In your introduction discuss appeals you have seen and explain why the appeal is being done differently. Give 3 ways that the Baptist Church can respond to the Refugee Crisis.

Submit this to the Facilitator, Sarah Rice, and share it with your coach.

Feel free to email or phone the Facilitator (Sarah Rice) thoughts or questions at any time through the ten months.

Coach/Supervisor

At the start of this ten-month option, you need to make arrangements with a suitable person to act as your coach through the ten months, meeting at least once every two months. This person should be someone accessible to your local context, able to meet physically or online with you regularly over this time. They need to be willing and able to walk alongside you during the ten months. Ask them if they would look at the five readings if they haven’t already. The objective is for your coach to meet with you and help you to assess your current ministry practice and develop your learning experience into new or altered patterns of ministry practice in your own context. Email this Guide to Coaching page to a potential coach to see that they are willing and able to work with you throughout the ten months, which will involve five or six meetings with you of about an hour in length.


Facilitator: Sarah Rice

Sarah is a Co-Pastor serving at Papanui Baptist Church in Christchurch. She studied theology at Carey Baptist College. After completing her studies, she married Elliot and they moved into an “intentional living community” - this is where people live in close proximity with others, united by daily spiritual rhythms, with a desire to participate in Christ’s mission in the local community. Sarah and Elliot believe God has made humans to live in community where the highs and lows of life are shared.

Sarah loves seeing people participate in what God is up to in this world, when they’re united to Christ by the Spirit to give the Father glory. Whether this is in the work place, the home, the school, or the local dairy, Jesus is up to something in our neighbourhood and we want to join in!

Email This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it., the facilitator of this Glo-cal Leadership option if you have specific questions about this option.

Email Andrea or Mike at This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it. if you have any general questions about Lifelong Learning or Baptist Leaders' Registration.

PARTICIPANTS: Up to a maximum of 20 at any time.

COST: This course is free for registered Baptist Leaders. All other registrants will be email invoiced NZD$50 per Guided Learning option.

[updated 15 February 2017]

Event Properties

Event Date 01-02-2017
Event End Date 15-11-2017
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